Naeroyfjord

With a lot of enthusiasm and wrong assumptions my sister and I planned our trip this year. We chose Norway, thinking that by the 1st of May spring surely would’ve arrived in Norway as well.
As we were to find out, this was quite wrong.

We started out our trip with, what is called Norway’s most scenic route: From Oslo to Myrdal, then taking the Flamabana and finishing of with the Ferry down the Naeroyfjord to Gudvangen.
When we first recognised the snow plow on the front of the train in Oslo, it dawned on us, that this trip might not be what we were expecting. The amount of people boarding the train with skis was another give away.
Sure enough within an hour, we had reached a high plateau and the snow was whizzing past our window as the snow plow pushed it from the rails.
The Hardangervidda, the high plateau in central Norway, is still very beautiful under snow but we had been hoping for green rather than white countryside. The Kjosfossen, a big waterfall on the way down to Flam, was still partially frozen, which has a lot of charme too.

Once we reached the valley of the Naeroy fjord, the snow was gone, thankfully. However, the cold had stayed and there was no sign of spring just yet; some trees were showing a tentatitve green at the tips of their branches, but overall winter was still in control. This also describes our first night in our tent.. It was freezing cold and even though we’d dressed in every layer we could find, we could still feel the cold seeping in.

The next morning, the sun came out to greet us. However it was noon by the time the sun light finally reached the bottom of the steep and narrow Naeroyfjord and our tent. In glazing sun light we continued on, out of the Naeroy fjord and back up onto the Hardangervidda in our very own private bus.. clearly tourist season hasn’t started yet.
Up on the plain in the sun light the colors of the river and lakes varied from a dark black to a marvellous light turquoise and the pine trees added spots of green amidst the white of the snow and the grey of the solid rocks. So much can change if there’s just a tinsy bit of sun light available.

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3 comments

  1. What a poetic way to describe that it is freezing cold!
    Hope you are well and not suffering too much from the cold!


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